Tag Archives: Norman Osborn

New Comic Book Day September 29, 2021: My Pull List And Pick Of The Week

Every Wednesday is New Comic Book Day and every New Comic Book Day brings something that enriches my world. I imagine many fellow comic book fans feel the same. They may not do what I do and wake up at 4:30 in the morning every Wednesday to read all the new books on their pull list, but the sentiment is still the same.

The world is a crazy, chaotic place. We’re also entering a time of year where the days are getting shorter, the weather is getting colder, and random trips to the beach aren’t as feasible, unless you live in a tropical climate. This is a span of time that is light on holidays, heavy on school, and high on stress. We all need something to help us endure.

For me, having a stack of new comics to look forward to every week doesn’t just help. It energizes my soul. It’s like getting a pep talk from Captain America every week. It just encourages me to get out there, endure all the craziness, and let my love of comics give me the jolt I need every week. It’s a beautiful thing.

This week promises to be even more beautiful than most. Some major events are gearing up, as they often do every fall. Both Marvel and DC Comics love to start major events in the early fall, often allowing them to conclude just in time for the holidays. They make for exciting times, as well as wild speculation on message boards. What more could a comic book fan ask for?

Once again, I offer my pull list and pick of the week. Always, I hope a new batch of comics gives you all the strength you need to endure another week. Enjoy!


My Pull List

Action Comics #1035

Amazing Spider-Man #74

Batman/Superman #22

Black Cat #10

BRZRKR #5

The Darkhold Alpha #1

Detective Comics #1043

Extreme Carnage: Omega #1

Grimm Fairy Tales #52

Harley Quinn #7

Inferno #1

Justice League #68

Miles Morales: Spider-Man #30

S.W.O.R.D. #8

Star Wars #17

Superman ’78 #2

Superman: Son of Kal-El #3

Wolverine #16


My Pick Of The Week
Amazing Spider-Man #74

Leave a comment

Filed under Jack's Quick Pick Comic

Lessons In Forgiveness: Spider-Man 3 vs. Avatar: The Last Airbender

The following is a video from my YouTube channel, Jack’s World. It’s a video I’ve been working on for a while and I’m very excited about this one. Once again, I get to make a video where I talk about superhero movies. Sam Rami’s Spider-Man trilogy really was a game-changer for the genre and I’ll be forever grateful for that. However, this time I also get to talk about one of the best and most beloved animated shows in history, “Avatar: The Last Airbender.”

I recently rediscovered this show on Netflix and I’ve been eager to talk about it. This video is my first deep dive into the larger concepts behind this amazing show, as well as those that played out in the Raimi trilogy. Specifically, this video focuses on forgiveness and how it can give a story dramatic weight.

I hope this video gets a good response because I had a lot of fun making it. I hope you enjoy it too.

Leave a comment

Filed under Jack's World, Marvel, philosophy, Spider-Man, superhero comics, superhero movies, YouTube

Jack Fisher’s Weekly Quick Pick Comic: Spider-Man Life Story #1

Every week, the world gets a brief reprieve from being a chaotic mess when a fresh crop of comics enters the world. Most call it Wednesday. Others, like myself, call it New Comic Day. It’s like a weekly holiday, minus the decorations, gift giving, and crowded airports. On this unique day, I pick one particular comic to single out as worthy of making this day feel extra festive.

This week brings us a special gem from everyone’s third favorite friendly neighborhood Spider-Man, after Spider-Ham and Spider-Gwen. It comes courtesy of one of Marvel’s top scribes in Chip Zdarsky and one of their top artists in Mark Bagley. While there has always been an abundance of Spider-Man comics, “Spider-Man: Life Story #1” stands out in a uniquely charming way.

For much of Spider-Man’s contemporary history, there has been an ongoing challenge, of sorts, when it comes to keeping him relevant. Writers, artists, and movie producers keep having to update Spider-Man’s story, somewhat, so that he feels modern. That’s not easy for a character who first debuted in 1962, courtesy of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.

Over the years, Peter Parker has found himself reinvented into many eras, from disco to social media. Marvel has always been somewhat coy about how characters like Spider-Man can show up in these eras and not seem to age, but that’s exactly what makes “Spider-Man: Life Story #1” so unique.

It doesn’t try to put Peter Parker in a more modern context. It doesn’t try to radically change who he is so that he fits into a more familiar world. Instead, Zdarsky and Bagley do the complete opposite and just let his story unfold within the era that first created him.

There’s no sliding timescale here. The year is 1966. Peter has had his Spider-Man powers for four years. He’s in college, the Vietnam War is ongoing, hippies are starting to grow in population, and cigarette’s are still advertised for their health benefits. This is the world in which Spider-Man was initially birthed and this is the world in which his story unfolds.

It’s a familiar story, one that frequently relies on Peter trying to balance his life as a college student with his superhero life as Spider-Man. However, that familiarity is exactly what helps “Spider-Man: Life Story #1” work so well as a concept and a setting. While it isn’t bound by the same 50-plus years of comic book continuity, it is bound by the circumstances of the mid-1960s.

This is a very different time for superheroes and non-superheroes alike. It’s not just that soda costs a quarter and the idea of alternative facts can be attributed to bad acid trips. This is a time of major social upheaval, especially in places like New York. Issues surrounding the Vietnam War aren’t just affecting Peter. They’re affecting his friends and other heroes, like Captain America.

It’s a world in which Peter struggles with choices that don’t just involve being on time for class. He’s seeing friends/bullies like Flash Thompson get drafted into a war that is just starting to go poorly. He’s watching other superheroes who don’t have to deal with J. Jonah Jameson make difficult choices about whether to get involved. What does an aspiring superhero do in that kind of world?

It makes for an interesting and dramatic backdrop for “Spider-Man: Life Story #1.” Peter still deals with typical Spider-Man issues, like getting to class on time and pursuing a blossoming relationship with Gwen Stacy. There are also a few battles with familiar enemies, namely the Green Goblin, who’s an asshole in any era. However, neither Peter Parker nor Spider-Man are bigger than the issues of the world around them.

In many respects, it brings out a more balanced Spider-Man. His struggles in dealing with the times and circumstances around him makes Peter Parker feel more real. It has always been part of his appeal, going back to the era of Lee and Ditko. He’s not some billionaire playboy or legendary soldier. He’s just a nerdy kid who got super-powers by accident.

This is a Peter Parker who isn’t bound by the old Comic Code Authority or aversions to political undertones. Zdarsky and Bagley let him live and react to the world of 1966 in a way that’s both believable and engaging. Essentially, they let him be the character that Lee and Ditko created within the times of his creation.

Those turbulent times set up even more drama as issues like the Vietnam War and the growing mistrust between people and authority start to grow. Peter’s youth puts him in the front row of the emerging chaos while the adults around him, including other superheroes, find themselves affected in ways that would’ve abhorred 1960s censors.

In a sense, the times and the larger world of “Spider-Man: Life Story #1” is the biggest appeal of the story. It allows complexity and drama that isn’t typical of a modern Spider-Man comic, but somehow brings out the best in Peter Parker and those around him, even if J. Jonah Jameson is still an annoying blowhard.

Leave a comment

Filed under Jack's Quick Pick Comic